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Letters

Enya samacharam

A Day Without Rain will be released across the world very soon; at least, across 'almost' all the world. Its release in India is doubtful.

This really does not come as a surprise. Unadventurous music companies would much rather increase their profits by sticking to the tried and tested, instead of giving the stagnating Indian music scene a much needed boost by releasing new and refreshing sounds.

A Day Without Rain is Enya's upcoming release. Described as Ireland's most popular export, she comes second only to the Irish legends U2 in popularity. With record sales of more than 50 million albums she is one of the world's most successful female recording artists.

The queen of New Age started her career touring with her family band Clannad. She has released four full-length albums, two of which have won Grammy Awards, and a 'best of' compilation in 1997. Only The Memory of Trees and Paint The Sky With Stars are available in India.

Paint The Sky With Stars featured the immensely popular Orinoco Flow (Sail away), a song which received extensive video and air -play and was also featured on the Indian charts for over three weeks.

Enya's music is a seamless blend of technology and rhythm, and her use of multi-layered vocals add an ethereal touch to her music. Described as 'healing', her music has an other-worldly aura that encourages a listener to look within.

Let us break away from boundaries set by music labels and get A Day Without Rain released in India. We need a break from the old, the redundant and the recycled; we need music that washes from the soul the dust of everyday living ...

You can listen to Audio samples from her new album at http://www.enya-online.com

Please send an e-mail to Music Today (musictoday@vsnl.com), Warner Representatives in India, to let them know that you support the release of her album in India.

Please mention your location to them. e.g. Delhi, India.
Or you can write to them at:

Music Today
Hamilton House, 1-A, Connaught Place,
New Delhi 110001
Phone - (011) 3352233
Address you letters to Mr Chander M Rai,
executive director of Music Today

Abhay Adhikari
New Delhi

Read the review that got Vikas's goat Lack of taste?

I am amazed with your write-up on Pervez's album Dard-e-dil. You obviously have no clue about music and should not write about something you do not understand.

Though you may or may not have got Pervez's biography right (who cares anyway, it's his music we are interested in), you were very transparent in your lack of knowledge and taste in good music.

Some advice: Keep away from writing 'bout something you do not understand. You have talent, you would make a good filmi gossip writer.... but fools rush in.....

Vikas Varma
Mumbai

(We wrote to Vikas saying we would like to know what exactly his grouse was, and got another diatribe in return! -- Ed)

Are you celebrity enough?

When someone becomes a critic, specially when writing/criticising about an abstract form like music/film etc, specially on a public platform, it is essential to establish one's own credentials.

Every kid on the street has an opinion and I am sure he/she strongly believes in it and will argue their point of view (rightfully so) with more passion than it might have taken Pervez to create this album.

Arguing with passion on the abstract is the only way of doing it, as logic does not prevail in the non-tangibles.

If Rahman or Lata or Louis and people with established credentials give an opinion, I would not react in this manner.

That is why all credible media ensure they have critics with established credentials.

For example a Sunny or an Ian is paid a bomb to opine about a cricket match. What they say is not rocket science, but people listen.

The problem is, you do not have credentials (at least not on the web page where you mirrored your views).

Going on the premises that you do not have credentials that would give weight to your opinion, it makes more sense sticking to facts in a journalistic fashion and not try and be a critic.

On the other hand, if you have credentials (made many successful music albums or studied music for many years under a great guru or studied music in, for example Berkley, etc.), then I recommend you put them up next to your views on somebody else's musical talents.

People will take you more seriously then and not respond in the manner I have.

And if you are none of the above, then wait till people know you at least as an experienced journalist, otherwise... Best of luck, you will need it.

Vikas Varma


(What can one say to someone who blindly worships celebrities and just doesn't know why he is unhappy with a review? I have studied music for many years, but that is beside the point. Every intelligent culture understands the value of critically discussing a work of art. To believe that only celebrities are eligible to make critical judgment and to look down on the opinion of non-celebrities betrays a mind hopelessly conditioned by consumerist excesses. -- Suchitra)

Reader reactions to Vikas's letters

A god-send

The Music Magazine has truly been a godsend for a hardcore music-freak like me.

I listen to all sorts of stuff and I really appreciate the way you provide objective and no-nonsense reviews and coverage of so many different genres ranging from Mylapore kutcheris to Afro jazz.

Keep up the good work!

I just wanted to make a few subtle correction/ clarifications and suggestions. I may be wrong - just a few thoughts...

1) The reference to the term "tappanguchi" is incorrect for it is actually "tappan-koothu", the "koothu" term in Tamil referring to the story-song-plays staged by village/folk artistes.

2) The "nagaswaram" would be better referred to as the "nadaswaram" even though the usage of " nagaswaram " is widespread - it probably changes the meaning to reflect an association with 'naga' or snake.

3) Regarding the usage of the term "Karnatak" / "Carnatic" to describe the South Indian classical music. Wasn't it Hindustani classical music that had a strong base in North Karnataka with the Dharwad gharana and all?

How did music essentially nurtured in the erstwhile Madras state of old in Telugu and Tamil come to be described as "Carnatic"?

Perhaps you can enlighten me and other readers on this...just a curious question...
Anyway good luck and best wishes.

Jagan

Madras, currently in Philadelphia

(Thanks, will try to answer your questions soon -- Ed)

Request for band info

I am doing research on imported music from the USA to India. I was wondering if you could tell me what the most popular kinds of imported music are, what USA bands tour in India, and so on.

Thank you so much!

Sarah
SarahAnnelll@aol.com


I need some information about amateur rock bands in India. I would be very grateful if you could send me a list of the same with contact addresses.

Sachin Sancheti
Bangalore

(Can any reader help Sarah and Sachin? -- Ed)

Vishnu's names in Telugu lyrics

With the grace of the god, I happened to get into the hobby of composing lyrics in Sanskritized Telugu. Entitled Sri Haridasa Samkirtamulu, they bear "Haridasa" as the mudra (signature) and are organized into three parts:

The first part exposes the meaning of each of the Sri Vishnu Sahasranmamulu (thousand names of Vishnu), as I understood them, in lyrical form.

The second part describes the glory of the Lord and the lyrics are called Sriharidasa padamulu.

The third part exposes the meaning of Srimadbhagavadgita, as I understood it, and the lyrics are called Srihari Gitananda Lahari.

The English and Hindi transliterations of these lyrics, along with the original Telugu, are available on the web. Please spread the news to your friends, musicians, dance schools and music and dance associations.

Six audio cassettes have been released. They are available in Chennai as well as at SV Temple, Pittsburgh, USA. Details are available at: http://www9.50megs.com/sriharidasa/haridAsakIrtana/aBivamdanAlu.htm

Please be in touch with me if you have any difficulty in accessing the web pages.

Sree Sistla
Nepean, Ontario Canada


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